TechNews4Kids - In the Age of Automation, How Will AI Impact Future Jobs?

AI (Artificial Intelligence) has been the forefront of innovation when it comes to technology and convenience. How will that impact jobs in the future? Speaking of technology, NASA will soon use drones as a means to explore planets, where they've only used wheeled rovers before! Back on Earth, scientists studied the world's fastest ants -- how many steps can they take per second? Find out in our latest Tech News 4 Kids newsletter! Join our classes to learn all about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

Will AI Automation Impact Our Jobs?

(Forbes)

AI has changed how we do everyday things, like picking what movies to watch, what to buy, or how we go to places. However, this convenience might come at a price, though it's not all bad. What does this mean for our future? Check out these 5 predictions here!

Drones in Space

(Times for Kids)

We've used wheeled rovers to explore the surfaces of planets such as Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, as our main source of knowledge. However, it looks like NASA scientists are hoping to use drones to capture aerial views for the first time! Find out when we can expect to see these photos, and how it will all work, here.

How Fast Are the World's Fastest Ants?

(News for Kids)

47-steps-a-second-fast! That's right, these Saharan silver ants take 47 steps in one second. They do so to remain cool, as they live in the Sahara Desert, which is definitely a little bit hot. What did scientists learn from these speedy critters? Find out here!

Love these articles? Check out Tech News 4 Kids to read more news like this, and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

Top 5 Free Sites to Help Elementary and Middle Schoolers Learn to Code (Recommended by Create & Learn)

Coding is one of the most valuable skills to master for kids. Standards for K-12 computer science education have been established in 34 states in the US, and the number of students taking computer science AP exams has tripled over the last three years. 

Unfortunately, few schools are equipped to teach it adequately. 

At Create & Learn, students learn state of the art computer technologies such as AI, coding, and robotics, with experienced teachers. To help our students practice and master the learning out of our class time, we recommend some free online resources.

Here are the top five sites on our list:


1.Scratch (scratch.mit.edu)

Developed by MIT, Scratch is an excellent platform to get started with coding. It allows students to program their own interactive stories, games, and animations. It is used by tens of millions of learners around the world. We are also a huge fan of its creator, MIT Professor Mitch Resnick, who is an incredibly dedicated educator. The site does not have a formal curriculum. However, it has a very active community where you can find millions of excellent projects of all levels that students can easily follow along and remix. And this is what we encourage our students to do as extra practice when they take the Scratch Ninja or Accelerated Scratch classes. 



2. CS First

Speaking of Scratch curriculum, CS First is an excellent Scratch curriculum created by Google. We know a number of the contributing team members and have been impressed by their dedication to bringing computer science education to all students.  

CS First was created to empower teachers who do not have technical training to teach computer science . Consequently, it is particularly easy for students to follow outside of our classes. Another great thing about CS First is it has multiple series of classes that map to different interests areas such as sports, art, and games. So, students can find their favorite subjects and dig in!




3.Code.org

Have you heard of Hour of Code? That’s the annual world-wide big event organized by Code.org with hundreds of millions of students participating. The organization has made extraordinary contributions in coding education for kids. The site offers a wide range of web resources, tools, and apps for kids to get started in coding. One thing we like in particular about Code.org is in addition to coding, it also covers general computer science topics such as data and Internet.  

 



4.Khan Academy

Khan Academy offers computer science lessons in the form of instructional videos and exercises. The video may be particularly appealing for some learners. Their coding materials mostly cover HTML and Javascript which are not for beginners. However, the materials on general computing such as algorithms, Internet, and cybersecurity are well designed and offers rich learning.  


 


5. W3schools.com

W3Schools is an excellent site for advanced learners. Because of that, you don’t see it much as a resource for kids’ coding. But it is one of the most popular sites for adults who are new coding or want to pick up another language. The site started with web focused technologies such as HTML and JS in the early years and has expanded significantly to include almost all popular languages such as Python and Java. The step by step content and quizzes cover the core concepts in great details. We find it to be an effective way for our students in Python for AI and Build Your Web classes to practice and master what they have learned in classes. 




Have more questions about these platforms and how we use them? Feel free to email us at info@createandlearn.us. And, sign up for a free introduction class to have your child start coding or advance to the next level with our Scratch, Minecraft, and Python coding classes.

Role Model of the Month - Joy Jin on “Exploring and Pursuing Your Passion”

This month’s role model is Joy Jin, a bay area native and, a first-year medical student at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) who has some big goals for her future. However, it was things she learned while growing up, like competitive ice-skating and starting a nonprofit for the visually impaired, that led her Harvard and then to where she is today. 

We had the opportunity to interview Joy recently and here are some highlights. We hope you end up as inspired as we are! And check out the full video interview here. Want to open up your kids world? Check out our classes at create-learn.us.


Christie: Can you tell us a little bit more about your educational background throughout elementary, middle school, and high school?

Joy: I went to Hoover Elementary School, and then Turman, which is now renamed, and then Gunn High School.

When I was younger, I actually used to figure skate, so that really took up a lot of my time. But at school, I was very interested honestly in a bunch of different subjects. I loved reading. And then I became more interested in science as I grew older, for a number of reasons. 

In high school, I was pretty involved in research. I actually worked a little bit at UCSF as a volunteer at a lung cancer lab. In college I actually ended up studying molecular and cell biology, which was kind of prompted by my research in high school. And then I also did some nonprofit work and was just very interested in serving the community. Mostly, I worked with visually impaired individuals and younger children, so that was something that I continued throughout college. 


Christie: What are you currently doing now at UCSF?

Joy: We actually just started school about 5 weeks ago. The first week was orientation -- our orientation is called Difference Matter Orientation, and UCSF has a really big focus on recruiting physicians who look like the community that they’re serving. So, we have a lot of under-represented minorities and people who identify as part of different communities. That is just very inspiring to be with. We learned things like, how do you communicate with patients and to get to hear the patient’s story and their perspective so you can figure out how to, for example, diagnose someone but also address concerns they might have because of cultures that they came from.


Jessie: How did you decide going from molecular biology at Harvard to become a doctor?

Joy: I think I was always very interested in medicine because I think it’s very emotionally fulfilling to be able to serve patients and address concerns that they have. I used to be a competitive figure skater, and in high school I had a really bad injury where a pairs team collided into me while we were training. So, as a result, my leg was sliced open, and I spent a couple of months to recover from this injury. I really appreciated how important support systems are, and how we depend on the medical system to get you back to being a functional being... I just didn’t think that anything would compare emotionally for me. 

Aside from being a physician, I really would’ve considered maybe working at a biotech startup or somehow working in health policy. 

Christie: What do you think helped you get into Harvard, and now UCSF?

Joy: I don’t think I really know, but advice that might help, is I always had something that I cared about a lot and was passionate about, and I tried to do something about it, for example, starting a nonprofit. I got the idea when I was volunteering at Vista Center for the blind when I was younger and I learned how to read braille. I gradually started getting involved in the community. 

So I think, just taking advantage of the opportunities that you have and also understanding and taking the time to reflect, “why does this matter to me?” I think that give you purpose in what you’re doing and it motivates you to keep going further.


Jessie: A lot of our students are upper elementary school students or middle school, and we hope to have speakers like yourself to share with them your experiences back in those days, and how you feel about elementary and middle school now, and share any advice you might have.

Joy: When I was younger, I spent a lot of my time training for figure skating. I think one thing that I learned is the feeling of perseverance and hard work. When you’re younger in elementary school and middle school, you think you’re busy, but you get older and you’re always going to be busy. So I think it’s a great time to explore what you like doing.

If I could go back and give myself advice, I would say that if you find something that you think you enjoy doing, to spend time doing and and to keep doing it for as long as you can, because I think you learn a lot. The things I learned from spending 10-12 training years as a figure skater, I think can be applied to whatever job or whatever interest I have in the future. My advice is to keep doing something as long as you can, because you will learn a lot of lessons along the way. And I think it’s personally fulfilling, too.


Christie: Some students, and maybe some parents want this for their students, want to one day go to medical school and become a doctor, which is what you’re on the path to doing. What advice would you give for them to reach that end goal?

Joy: I was very lucky to have parents that were very supportive. If my parents had advice to give … I really valued their advice. But it was never like I had to take their advice, it was just another piece of the puzzle that I wanted to figure out. It was in combination with other things, like talking with older students, and things like that. Giving advice is great, but also give your child the freedom to pursue what they like, because if they find something that they really like, then they’re going to want to do it themselves.

For people who are interested in medicine, I think the best way is to talk to people you admire and who think you want to be in the future. Having role models is really important because you can’t be what you can’t see. 

On the practical side, do well in school. Take initiative. Put yourself in uncomfortable situations. 


Check out what else Joy has to share in her video here.

Create & Learn Monthly - From Harvard to UCSF Medical School, Meet Our Role Model of the Month: Joy Jin on Pursuing Passion!

We are so excited to introduce our role model of the month, Joy Jin! She is a STEM enthusiast and has an infectious passion for learning, as well as helping others. Also, we are thankful to parents who take the time to give some great feedback about our classes! See what they're talking about by joining our classes. And check out our top Facebook posting of the month on Pilot & Engineer Barbie dolls! Will this help girls garner more interest in STEM? Find out in our Create & Learn Monthly newsletter!


Role Model of the Month: Joy Jin

As a startup, we have a lot going on. This month, we are celebrating (and getting inspired by) our role model of the month, Joy!

This month’s role model is Joy, a first-year medical student at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) who has some big goals for her future. However, it was things she learned while growing up, like competitive ice-skating and starting a nonprofit for the visually impaired, that led her to where she is today. Learn more about what advice she has, as well as her story, here!


Parent Reviews

We're excited to share some positive feedback from parents!

In this month of gratitude, we are so grateful for the positive feedback we've been receiving from our parents! Find out what they're talking about by signing up for one of our introduction classes. :)


Top Facebook Post

This month, Barbie made to the top by becoming pilot and engineer!

Barbie Launched Pilot & Engineering Dolls!

(Evening Standard)

Virgin Atlantic's pilot Barbie ( Virgin Atlantic )

Remember playing house with Barbie growing up? Or maybe you knew someone that did? Well, Barbie just got a new job -- Mattel launched Pilot & Engineering Barbie, in partnership with Virgin Atlantic Airlines. The hopes are that these dolls will encourage more girls to become involved in STEM-related activities. Find out more about what their inspiration was, and where to find them, here!

Do you enjoy reading articles like these? Follow us on Facebook to read more news like this and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies and research behind these topics.

TechNews4Kids - Would You Like to Have Robot Arms?

Have you ever sat back and thought, what would it be like if I had an extra pair of hands? Robot arms might be the answer! In London, the Natural History Museum hosted its annual Wildlife Photographer of the Year Awards, and the photos are spectacular. AI is a large part of our day, as well as what we expect to be an even bigger part of our future. However, can it be fully trusted? Read on to learn more in our latest Tech News 4 Kids newsletter! Join our classes to learn all about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

Robot Arms Offer a Helpful Hand

(Fast Company)

Photo: sergeyryzhov/iStock

We've all been there: juggling too many things, maybe even carrying in the groceries, where we wished we had an extra pair of hands to help us. In Japan, though the technology is still in its early stages, tech experts are working on creating robotic arms to help in assembly lines. Find out how this technology works, and how it would be to give them a try, here!

Wildlife Photographer of the Year Awards

(News 4 Kids)

Source: © Yongqing Bao, Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

Every year in London, wildlife photographers are celebrated for the amazing footage they capture, and 2019 did not disappoint. This year at the Natural History Museum, photographers showed off their findings, and some of them were 10 years old! Scroll through the stunning photos from this year's winners here.

AI is Great -- But How Much Should We Trust It?

(Science News)

DMYTRO VIKARCHUK/SHUTTERSTOCK

AI (Artificial Intelligence) is part of our every day lives, and it looks like it will be for the foreseeable future. However, there are some data scientists that are wary of instantly trusting the results AI brings. What does this mean for us, and how can we use AI the smartest way possible? Find out here!

Love these articles? Check out Tech News 4 Kids to read more news like this, and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

TechNews4Kids - First All-Female Spacewalk Makes History

An all-female spacewalk took place earlier this October, and it was out of this world! What does this mean for the future of astronauts? Our laptops have changed how we work, and the portable Mac that started it all just turned 30! Speaking of computers, AI just might help us predict earthquakes, but how? Find out in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter!

NASA (Finally) Had an All-Female Spacewalk

(New York Times)

NASA/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Jessica Meir and Christina Koch made history on Friday October 18th when they became the first all-female crew to walk space. Their mission was to replace a a power controller at the International Space Station, and the walk lasted 7 hours and 17 minutes. Find out all about it here, and why this was a large step for mankind.

How the Mac Portable - Now 30 - Changed Everything

(Fast Company)

Photo: Rama/Wikimedia Commons

The Mac Portable was presented 30 years ago as a battery-operated, portable computer that was just as good as your desktop. Though it was a major flop and didn't catch on, it inspired what we all know today as the laptop. Learn more about the fascinating history here!

Can AI Predict When an Earthquake Will Happen?

(Wired)

Not only that, can AI predict an earthquake long before it happens, so we have time to prepare? That's what seismologists are hoping they will be able to do. There have been many trials and errors along the way, but there is hope on the horizon. Learn more about what they are working on here!

Love these articles? Check out Tech News 4 Kids to read more news like this, and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

TechNews4Kids - Why Your Kids Should Know About AI & How it Works

In this technological age, kids are growing up with phones and AI programs as the everyday norm. Why is it important that they understand how it all works? When it comes to sustainability, Abu Dhabi has found a way to turn art into sustainable energy. Speaking of eco-friendly ideas, there's a company working to stop us from using one-use cups, but how? Read all about it in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter!

Why Our Kids Should Know How AI Works

(Technology Review)

Everywhere we look there are phones, screens, and even cars that can diagnose themselves. AI is a big part of this, and it's important for our kids to understand how it works. There are many reasons for this, the most important being for their safety. But how would understanding AI do that? Learn more here!

Sustainable Art

(Smithsonian)

Starlit Stratus rendering, by Sunggi Park (LAGI).

It gets hot in Abu Dhabi certain times of year -- 105-degrees-daily hot. Typically, people are forced to stay indoors while shopping, where air conditioning keeps the temperature reasonable. However, there are artists that specialize in energy-saving public art pieces, and they just might hold the answer to making things more sustainable. Find out what projects are underway, and how they work, here!

Can We Make Disposable Coffee Cups Reusable?

(Fast Company)

Photo: CupClub

Not unlike AI, it's become a habitual part of of our daily routine to pick up our coffee in a paper cup, and then throw it away later that day. This has become an environmental issue, but an architecture firm is looking to change that. They have developed Cup Club, where they can make reusing cups as easy as it would be to throw them away. Find out how they plan to do this here!

Love these articles? Check out Tech News 4 Kids to read more news like this, and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

TechNews4Kids - Is the Loch Ness Monster Real? We're Finally Getting Answers, But it's Not What You'd Expect!

It's officially October! So why not start off the spooky month with an interesting DNA find related to the Loch Ness Monster, Nessie? While some states are enjoying cooler weather, it's still pretty hot out there, and some inventors are racing to create wearable air conditioners. And when it comes to our dogs, researchers have found that brain function varies by breed, so what does this mean for man's best friend? Read all about it in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter! Join our classes to learn all about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

What Does Loch Ness DNA Say About the Monster?

(News For Kids)

Source: University of Otago.

The Loch Ness Monster is one of the most well-known myth in the world. However, recent studies of the lake's DNA are showing us some very interesting -- and unexpected -- results. Hint: eels might be involved! Find out all about it by reading this article here!


The Race to Air-Conditioning That Can be Worn

(Fast Company)

Photo: courtesy Embr

It's been getting pretty hot these days. So hot, that records have been breaking. To combat this increase in heat, big companies like Sony are working to create devices that can cool individuals off. But how? Find out all about it here!


A Dog's Brain & What it Might Teach Us

(The Harvard Gazette)

Photos by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

It's no secret that dogs have their own unique personalities. However, Harvard researchers have been using their brains as a means to understand how breeding affects it, as well as its relationships to our own brain evolution. Learn all about the fascinating findings about man's best friend here!

Love these articles? Check out Tech News 4 Kids to read more news like this, and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

Create & Learn Monthly - Screen Time for Our Children Isn't Always Bad. Neither are the games!

Screen time tends to get a bad rep, especially when it comes to our kids. However, it isn't ALL bad! Games seem to have a similar reputation, but can they provide a better way to learn certain things? And we all love Shark Week over the summer, what are female scientists doing to encourage more girls to join them in shark research? Find out in our Create & Learn Monthly newsletter! Join our classes to learn all about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.


Can Screen Time Be Valuable for our Kids?

(USA Today)

(Photo: Michael Schennum/USA TODAY Network)

With phones, tablets, laptops, and more readily available to all of us, it makes sense that we worry about how it might affect us and our children. Though it's always good to practice moderation, screen time might provide more accessibility for our kids than ever before, which in turn could mean more opportunity. Learn more about how this might be here!


Games Might Be a Great Tool for Learning

(World Economic Forum)

Games, though fun, can often be viewed as a leisure activity more than a teaching tool. However, new research has shown that more games in the classroom for specific subjects can help our children's motivation to learn. Find out how this works, and what benefits games in the classroom hold, here!


The Gills Club is Connecting Girls with Female Scientists

(Nation Swell)

(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

We celebrated Shark Week earlier this summer, and it's clear that there is still a rather large gender disparity. Luckily, The Gills Club is looking to change that! They are pairing girls with female scientists to hopefully encourage more to enter the science field. Learn more about this club and the great work they're doing here!

Do you enjoy reading articles like these? Follow us on Facebook to read more news like this and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies and research behind these topics.

All About that Moon: Should We Go Back?

It’s been 50 years since America landed on the moon, and we wanted to celebrate with a moon-inspired newsletter! There has recently been an interest to head to the moon again, but why? When Apollo 11 landed on the moon, what did the facts and figures look like? And if you hopped onto a bicycle and peddled to the moon, how long would that take? Read all about it in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter! Join our classes to learn all about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.


Back to the Moon

(The New York Times)

Photo Credit: JPL/NASA

We landed on the moon 50 years ago, and until recently, the rush to visit again has been on pause. However, more countries are looking to send people to the moon, including the United States. What caused this race to the moon to suddenly become so important? And what do we need to know about it? Find out all about this moon race here!


Celebrating Apollo 11’s 50th: What it Cost to Get to the Moon

(Forbes)

50 years ago, Apollo 11 landed on the moon, marking an amazing time in American history. However, as unsurprising as it might be, it cost quite a bit to get there. Find out exactly how much it cost for NASA to put a man on the moon, and why it’s important, here!


Fly Me — Er, Bicycle Me to the Moon! How Long Would it Take?

(Wired)

Remember E.T. and the famous moment of the boy riding his bike with his alien friend to the moon? What if someone does do it…? Find out what this Wired journalist calculated, and the interesting things they found along the way, by checking out this article! You might be surprised by what you find.


Love these articles? Check out Tech News 4 Kids to read more news like this, and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×