banner

Monthly Newsletter

It’s a question we ask kids all the time. Yet, more often than not, the answer of what they want to do is the very thing that they have just been exposed to. If they just talked about the recent forest fires, they want to be a firefighter. If they helped to plant a garden, they want to be a farmer. If they see a police car go by with its lights flashing, they want to be a police officer. You get the idea… kids are very impressionable!

With the rate at which technology and science are growing and changing, kids today will have no idea of the jobs of the future unless we help them explore and understand the latest advances. At Create & Learn, we are giving students a glimpse of what they can become by teaching them the latest in technologies.

The first article we picked this month “Why schools should teach the curriculum of the future, not the past.” highlights the expanding gap between school curriculum and where the real world is. Another article we have highlighted here elaborates on the previous idea, and links future jobs to STEM topics: “Girls, If You Want To Change The World*, Try STEM” (*and earn a lot while doing it!)

We close out our September newsletter with an article called “Why Curiosity Matters.” It’s an interesting read that can apply across many areas of our lives and the lives of our children and students. At Create&Learn, we encourage curiosity and ask questions to foster exploration — hoping to inspire kids to try without fearing failure.

Aren’t you curious?… read these articles!

Why Schools Should Teach The Curriculum Of The Future, Not The Past

(World Economic Forum)

World Economic Forum World Economic Forum

We are faced with a big challenge in our schools today — the challenge to prepare our students for their future. Science and technology are speeding up the evolution of so many areas of learning, that the need to teach computer science is ever increasing. It’s not just about learning to code or write programs. Computer science builds skills like creativity, problem-solving, ethics, communication, and collaboration. These skills are useful in all types of careers, not just technical jobs.

Girls, If You Want To Change The World, Try STEM

(Forbes)

Forbes Forbes

According to a study, most girls said it’s important for them to have jobs that helped the world, yet many of them had the wrong perception about STEM careers — not being creative or making the world better. Our challenge is to “show girls that STEM careers align with their interests, values, and desire to make an impact. The most efficient and scalable way to do this is by integrating real-world relevance into school.”

Why Curiosity Matters

(Harvard Business Review)

Most of the amazing innovations and discoveries throughout history are the result of curiosity. Did you know that “when we are curious, we view tough situations more creatively? …As every parent knows, Why? is ubiquitous in the vocabulary of young children, who have an insatiable need to understand the world around them…. By the time we’re adults, we often suppress our curiosity.” Read about how important curiosity is for the old and young alike.

Do you enjoy reading articles like these? Follow us on Facebook! Also, be sure to try out our Computer Science classes at www.create-learn.us.

Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×