banner

Part of Your Family — the World Wide Web — Just Turned 30 :)

If we count things that we spend a lot of time on as part of the family, the World Wide Wed is certainly a very close relative. :) Remember the AOL “You’ve Got Mail!” ding? Well, so much has changed as the WWW turned 30 a couple of weeks ago! Share with your kids about its early days. Also in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter, learn about how honey might detect air pollution, as well as how some New Zealand farmers are using drones to herd their sheep! Join our classes to learn more about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

The World Wide Web Says Cheers to 30 Years

(News For Kids)

In 1989, Tim Berners-Lee, a scientist working at a research group called CERN in Switzerland had an idea for an easy way to look up and share almost any kind of information over the internet. The picture shows Mr. Berners-Lee in 1994, four years after he invented the WWW. (Source: ©1994, CERN.) In 1989, Tim Berners-Lee, a scientist working at a research group called CERN in Switzerland had an idea for an easy way to look up and share almost any kind of information over the internet. The picture shows Mr. Berners-Lee in 1994, four years after he invented the WWW. (Source: ©1994, CERN.)

Happy birthday to the World Wide Web! Do your kids spend a lot of time watching YouTube videos, texting friends, and playing games? They have the WWW, which just turned 30 a couple of weeks ago, to thank for that. Of course, there is lots of science behind the creation of the WWW. Learn all about who created the WWW and why here!

Catching Pollution Data With Honey

(The New York Times)

Kate Smith, a graduate student at the University of British Columbia, taking samples from a hive. Credit: J.Common Kate Smith, a graduate student at the University of British Columbia, taking samples from a hive. Credit: J.Common

It’s true — you can catch more flies with honey! Well, if by flies you mean pollution. It turns out, honey just might give us information about pollution and how bad it is in any given area. Scientists realized that there was a difference between the honey produced by bees in more rural areas than in cities, including traces of lead. What does this mean for the future of our bees and detecting air pollution? Read all about it here!

Can Drones Effectively Herd Sheep?

(Futurism)

TNZ/VICTOR TANGERMANN TNZ/VICTOR TANGERMANN

In New Zealand, some farmers have been using drones to herd sheep! And, according to them, it’s working better than dogs ever did. However, these aren’t just any kind of drones. Find out how farmers are using technology to help with daily tasks here!

Love these articles? Check out TechNews4Kids to read more news like these and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×