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How Does the Internet Cross the Ocean? Let’s Find Out!

We all use the internet daily, for work and for fun. Did you know that there are tiny wires as thin as strands of hair lining ocean floors to ensure that happens? Almost as impressive, a new slow-motion video captured what the speed of light looks like. And when it comes to the future of food, what will our protein sources look like? That and more in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter! Join our classes to learn more about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

Internet Under the Sea

(New York Times)

We all know about the elusive ‘cloud’ that stores all of our valuable information and data like our photos and texts, but big companies are looking to make the ocean a far more viable source. There are currently already tiny, hair-thin cables lining oceans, but what’s next? And what does this mean for the future of internet browsing and file sharing? Find out by reading this article here!

Seeing the Speed of Light

(Live Science)

We all know that the speed of light is, well, pretty fast. So fast that it’s incomprehensible as to how to see it. Luckily, some scientists have built a camera that would capture just how fast the speed of light is! Learn all about what these scientists did to catch this on film, and take a look at this amazing slow motion video here!

Future Food

(Johns Hopkins Magazine)

ILLUSTRATIONS BY DALBERT B. VILARINO ILLUSTRATIONS BY DALBERT B. VILARINO

Vegetarianism and veganism have slowly been gaining more headway in regards to a typical diet. As a result, new forms of proteins to replace meat and animal products as a whole have been the creative projects of chefs and scientists alike. What does this mean for the future of our foods? Find out what people are doing to create new forms of protein and the fascinating science behind it here!

Love these articles? Check out TechNews4Kids to read more news like these and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

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