More Reasons Why Your Mom Was Right About Broccoli

You’ve been feeding your kids the broccoli that your mom asked you to eat. Here is one more reason why the fight is worth it: in a recent find, cruciferous veggies have been found to hold qualities that just might fight off tumors, but how? Jeff Bezos has been on the forefront of technology for a long time. He is now onto chips that power AI. Under the sea, scientists have just found the “platypus” of the crab world. Learn all about it in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter! Join our classes to learn all about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

A Broccoli a Day Keeps the Cancer Away?

(The Harvard Gazette)

We grew up thinking that an “apple a day” is the answer to good health, but brussels sprouts and broccoli might have just taken the lead. New research has found that certain compounds in these cruciferous veggies link to one of the body’s most potent tumor-suppressing genes. Find out exactly what researchers found, and all the scientific details, here!

This New Chip Could Be the Future for AI

(MIT Technology Review)

PHOTOGRAPH BY TONY LUONG

What do karate-chopping robots, flapping drones, scientists, and sci-fi authors have in common? The exclusive Amazon-hosted MARS event, of course! At this recent conference, a new chip was presented that just might be the future of AI. This chip would replace the conventional silicone chips and would be placed in things like drones and robots. Find out more about this amazing new chip and all it’s capable of here!

Platypus of the Crab World Discovered By Paleontologists

(Forbes)

Credit: Elissa Martin, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History

It’s truly perplexing what scientists have found — a very platypus-like crab, Callichimaera perplexa. In fact, it’s unlike any other crab that’s been discovered. What is it that makes a crab a crab? That’s the question scientists are asking now after this discovery. Learn all about this unique and strange find here!

Love these articles? Check out Tech News 4 Kids to read more news like this, and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

Create & Learn Monthly — 4 Easy Ways to Tell if a Coding Program is Right for your Kids

Create & Learn Monthly — 4 Easy Ways to Tell if a Coding Program is Right for your Kids

With summer right around the corner, we are sharing some great tips for your kids’ learning and an inspiring story.

4 Simple Ways to Tell if Your Kid’s Coding Class Will Work as Advertised

(Create & Learn)

Pictures of happy kids, shiny computers, big smiles, and enticing class descriptions … this is what you see on almost every website that advertises kids computer classes. But how do you tell if your kid will really learn? Check out these 4 simple yet effective ways to tell if a program is as good as it advertises, and some of the ways might surprise you. Read on to find out more!

Meet the 10-year-old coder grabbing the attention of Google, Microsoft and Michelle Obama

(CNBC)

Samaira Mehta: CNBC

Samaira Mehta is changing the coding game, and she’s only 10! Mehta is founder and CEO of her own company CoderBunnyz, which is a board game that teaches players as young as 4 basic coding concepts. When she was learning to code, she noticed a gap in the education field that was much needed, and decided to create her own game. Learn all about Mehta and CoderBunnyz here!

Tips on how to talk to your children about cybersecurity

(IOL)

As our children grow up, it’s inevitable that technology and the internet will become part of their daily lives just as much as our own. Cybersecurity is an increasingly important issue, but when do we let our kids know of this? And what’s the best way to do it? Learn all about it here!

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4 Simple Ways to Tell if Your Kid’s Coding Class Will Work as Advertised

Pictures of happy kids, shiny computers, big smiles, and enticing class descriptions … this is what you see on almost every website that advertises kids computer classes. But how do you tell if your kid will really learn? In fact, even after your kid has gone through the program and seemed happy, how much have they actually learned?

These are important questions because coding is a critical skill to master and schools teach very little of it. So, parents have to turn to after-school programs/camps to make sure their kids fill the gap. I struggled with these questions for years myself before founding Create & Learn. My daughter started attending tech camps in summer since age 6. But results had been mostly disappointing (and the most expensive ones often fell short the most). I spent a lot of efforts figuring out what she had learned and benchmarking. But for busy parents who don’t have time, or those who don’t have a coding background, how can you tell?

Luckily over the years, we have found some very simple but strong indicators of program quality that will only take you a few minutes to check without having to do hours of deep research. The key is to go beyond the fancy pictures and words, and get to the foundation of the programs.

#1: Class Size

Your intuition probably tells you smaller class size is better already. But do you realize it pretty much sets the ceiling for how good a program can be? Even the best teacher in the world will have his/her hands tied in a large classroom because the teacher can no longer adapt to individual student’s needs. Personalized attention is particularly important for developing students’ creativity and critical thinking skills. What we have found is that if there are more than half a dozen students per class, the teaching will likely be instruction-based following a rigid template, without sufficient attention to each student’s strength and areas of needs. For elementary or middle school students who are still learning how to learn, the lack of individual attention will fail to deliver the best learning.

#2: Differentiated Projects

When you see your kid’s projects at the end of a program, don’t just get excited about what your kids have done :). Take a look at how your child’s projects are different from those of other students’. In many programs, students produce almost identical projects. This is because instead of teaching kids coding, teachers just hand detailed instructions for building the projects to students, who then blindly follow the steps. There is little true learning, exploring, and creating. As a result, even after producing the projects, many students still don’t understand what they have done.

#3: Teacher’s Background

Most camps are staffed by high school and college students. They are great people, and some may care about teaching, but can they teach well? Teaching is a skill that takes many years to master. Think for a second examples from your own school days, of both good and bad teachers. Did they make a world of difference in your own learning? Effective teachers not only help your kid do one class well, but also nourish his/her passion for learning in general. The reverse is also true. The influence of a poor teacher can go far beyond a single class. So be very mindful about who teach your kids.

#4: Who Created the Curriculum?

Learning coding is not that different from learning skills like painting or swimming in that learning from the masters or Olympians will no doubt set your kids on a much more successful path. The experiences and accomplishments in the tech world of the people who create the curriculum determine how far the program can bring your kids. If you would like your kids to go far in the tech world, find out if the curriculum team has worked in the top tech companies and if they are insiders of both the tech and business side of the broader high-tech industry, not just someone who can code.

There you have it!

To sum up, check out these 4 things before signing up your kids for a coding class/camp:

  • Class size — ideally no more than 5–6 students per class
  • Whether students produce diverse projects
  • Background of the teachers — do they have extensive teaching experiences?
  • Who created the curriculum — do they just know how to code, or have they held important technical and business roles in top tech companies?

Here’s to all of our kids having fun, learning and flourishing! If you would like to get a taste of what a first-tier program looks like, sign up for a free class at www.create-learn.us.

Hard to Believe? Use Transparent Wood Instead of Glass for Buildings

With climate change seemingly at the center of the conversation these days, more sustainable ways of doing things are increasingly appealing. The creation of transparent wood just might be what our buildings need to be more energy-efficient. Scientists are also researching flatworms and their amazing regenerative qualities — is this something that we might be able to harness? And when it comes to space, NASA’s Hubble is showing us just how swiftly our universe is expanding. Learn all about it in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter! Join our classes to learn all about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

Into the Wood: Our Green Energy Answer?

(Smithsonian)

American Chemical Society

Swedish researchers, fascinated by humans’ use of wood to create homes throughout history, decided to see if there were ways to harness it for green energy. They came up with a way to modify the wood to make it transparent, and possibly more sustainable than the glass we use as windows. It just might be the future! Learn all about the technology they are using to test the wood here.

The Regenerative Powers of Flatworms Explored

(Stanford News)

Sinhya / Getty Images

Flatworms have the amazing ability to regenerate their entire body from just a sliver of themselves. Despite many tests and theories, harnessing this unique and mysterious tool has been incredibly difficult, until now. Someone on the bioengineering team might’ve found how we can use this ability to help humans regenerate their own cells, but how? Find out more here!

The Universe is Expanding

(Hub)

NASA’s space telescope Hubble has shown scientists that the universe is expanding at a much more rapid rate than anticipated. This means that there might need to be new physics created in order to accurately understand what is happening, and how fast. Learn more about the amazing science behind it here!

Love these articles? Check out TechNews4Kids to read more news like these and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

See How Drones Are Helping People Needing Critical Supplies

See How Drones Are Helping People in Need of Critical Medical Supplies

Just past Neptune is a minor planet that’s been known by humans for over a decade, and scientists have finally decided to name it — but they asked the public for some help to do so. In another part of space, Saturn’s moon, Titan, was found to have deep lakes! What does this mean? Back on Earth, Ghana has been using drones to deliver important medical supplies, does this change how we all might be delivering sensitive products in the future? Find out in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter! Join our classes to learn all about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

Is Gonggong the Best Name for a Minor Planet?

(The New York Times)

Alex H. Parker

What do you call a minor planet, about half the size of Pluto, that’s in the far reaches of the solar system? Astronomers didn’t know, either! After deciding that 2007 OR10 wasn’t the best name, they narrowed the choices down to three options, but asked the public to decide which one was best. Find out more about this minor planet and the names the public voted for here!

We’re Learning More About Saturn’s Moon, Titan

(MIT Technology Review)

NASA researchers have been exploring Titan for some time now, hoping to glean new information about Saturn’s largest moon. Deep methane-filled lakes were found thanks to NASA’s Cassini-probe. Learn more about what these findings mean and the amazing technology used to discover it here!

Drones, Ziplines & Medical Supplies: How Ghana Delivering Medicine

(News For Kids)

Source: Zipline.

Drones aren’t just for fun aerial shots now. Ghana and Rwanda have been using them to deliver important medical supplies in a push to help those that don’t live near the hospital or city-center. It’s relatively new, and the process is fascinating! Maybe this will catch on in the United States? Find out what Ghana is doing to assist those in rural areas using drones here.

Love these articles? Check out TechNews4Kids to read more news like these and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

Can AI Really Learn How to Play Jazz? Plus, Join Our Coding Contest!

AI technology advancements have created some amazing things, including the ability to create art. What does it look like when computer scientists use AI to perform jazz music? Speaking of amazing advancements, a new technique tracks brain activity 60 times faster than an MRI, but how? And when it comes to eating with the climate in mind, what’s better: a Locavore diet or a Vegetarian one? Find out in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter!

We are also hosting a fun coding competition for those of you with children who love to use Scratch. Learn all about it and enter here! Join our classes to learn all about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

Can AI Learn How to Jam?

(Scientific American)

Credit: Eric Nyffeler

AI can do so many incredible things, like write a book, design furniture, or create art. However, some computer scientists have been wondering if AI can create improvised music, such as jazz. Find out how these questions came about, and what is next in regards to AI and music, in this article!

Real-Time Brain Activity

(The Harvard Gazette)

iStock

The human brain has fascinated scientists and biologists alike. It’s fast-reacting, and specific, neurons have been difficult to catch in real-time — until now. Researchers have found a new way to track the amazing things our brain does at such a fast pace that it’s almost like watching it happen instantly. Find out what these scientists are hoping to do with their findings, and how it all works, here!

Locavore vs. Vegetarian — What’s Better For the Planet?

(The Conversation)

Climate change is happening, and food plays a part in this. So, people have been doing their best to be more conscious of their food choices. This consciousness brought about a question — is it better to be a Locavore (where you only eat foods grown and harvested within a certain radius of your home) or a Vegetarian? Find out what researchers have found here!

Love these articles? Check out TechNews4Kids to read more news like these and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

Create & Learn Monthly — The AP Exam — Another Great Reason to Learn Computer Science Early

Create & Learn Monthly — The AP Exam — Another Great Reason to Learn Computer Science Early

Your kids’ Computer Science learning can be translated directly to college admission more so than ever as more and more students take the Computer Science AP exam. Huge progress has been made in recent years which offer strong evidence of its popularity. However, big gaps still remain for female and minority students. We took a look at the 2018 AP Exam Computer Science results and have summarized the key insights for you. Speaking of college admission, there are more competitions in computer science also, because of how desirable it is. And can kindness really be a skill we can all learn? Find out in our May 2019 Monthly Newsletter! Join our classes to learn more about the state-of-the-art technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

Despite Progress, Significant Gaps Remain for Females & Minorities in Computer Science AP Exams

(Create & Learn)

The AP (Advanced Placement) exam has been gaining traction in regards to the number of tests being taken each year. We looked at the Computer Science test numbers to see what interesting information it offers. There is a ton! Take a look at what we found in our latest article here.

What it really looks like to be a computer science hopeful

(The Daily)

Computer Science (CS) is one of the most practical and economic major to go into in college, with basically a guarantee to get a job right away. But with great job security after graduation comes great competition. Naturally, it is highly competitive to get into. So what does this mean for our children looking to merge into the field, and how can you help? Find out here.

Kindness Is a Skill

(The New York Times)

Nick Shepherd/Ikon Images, via Getty Images

What does it take to be kind? And can it be learned? Specific scenarios bring out different sides of who we are and how we handle them. Each situation is explored with a unique perspective, and how we can be the most kind we can. Find out what we can do in regards to kindness and how to build that skill set here.

Do you enjoy reading articles like these? Follow us on Facebook to read more news like this and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies and research behind these topics.

Mini Roller Coasters Earn Girl Scouts Engineering Badges

There’s more than just earning camping or philanthropic badges, Girl Scouts are looking to expand what it means to be a Scout. In Maryland, more than 30 members of the local troops built miniature roller coasters to earn their Engineering badges. In science news, the periodic table turns 150, while chimpanzees are facing an unfortunate cultural crisis. Find out in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter! Join our classes to learn all about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

Girl Scouts in Maryland Earn Engineering Badges

(Johns Hopkins Magazine)

Johns Hopkins Magazine Johns Hopkins Magazine

It’s not just about earning Brownie Wings anymore. Over 30 members from troops all across Central Maryland built miniature roller coasters from everyday items to earn their Engineering Badges! Alongside Johns Hopkins Engineering students, the Scouts were able to get real-life experience in a fun and interactive way. Find out all about what they learned, and what’s next for these Girl Scouts, here!

Happy 150th Birthday to the Periodic Table!

(Youngzine)

iStock iStock

Remember seeing these in your high school chemistry classroom? Well, the Periodic Table just turned 150! More than that, 2019 has been designated the “international year of the periodic table of chemical elements” by the United Nations. Learn all about the man, Dmitri Mendeleev, who created this table, and how it has changed science for the world as a whole here!

Why Are Chimpanzees Facing a Cultural Crisis?

(The Conversation)

Ari Wid / shutterstock Ari Wid / shutterstock

About a half-century ago, it was discovered that monkeys used tools in everyday life (especially to eat). However, when it comes to culture, chimpanzees have always been the main focus. With changing times and the addition of more and more humans in areas where chimpanzees live, their culture has been suffering from a collapse. Find out more about this unfortunate collapse and how it happened here.

Love these articles? Check out TechNews4Kids to read more news like these and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn all about the technologies driving these innovations.

How Does the Internet Cross the Ocean? Let’s Find Out!

We all use the internet daily, for work and for fun. Did you know that there are tiny wires as thin as strands of hair lining ocean floors to ensure that happens? Almost as impressive, a new slow-motion video captured what the speed of light looks like. And when it comes to the future of food, what will our protein sources look like? That and more in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter! Join our classes to learn more about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

Internet Under the Sea

(New York Times)

We all know about the elusive ‘cloud’ that stores all of our valuable information and data like our photos and texts, but big companies are looking to make the ocean a far more viable source. There are currently already tiny, hair-thin cables lining oceans, but what’s next? And what does this mean for the future of internet browsing and file sharing? Find out by reading this article here!

Seeing the Speed of Light

(Live Science)

We all know that the speed of light is, well, pretty fast. So fast that it’s incomprehensible as to how to see it. Luckily, some scientists have built a camera that would capture just how fast the speed of light is! Learn all about what these scientists did to catch this on film, and take a look at this amazing slow motion video here!

Future Food

(Johns Hopkins Magazine)

ILLUSTRATIONS BY DALBERT B. VILARINO ILLUSTRATIONS BY DALBERT B. VILARINO

Vegetarianism and veganism have slowly been gaining more headway in regards to a typical diet. As a result, new forms of proteins to replace meat and animal products as a whole have been the creative projects of chefs and scientists alike. What does this mean for the future of our foods? Find out what people are doing to create new forms of protein and the fascinating science behind it here!

Love these articles? Check out TechNews4Kids to read more news like these and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

How to Make Electric Cars Cheaper? Something as Thin as Hair May Hold the Secret.

Scientists are rushing to make electric cars more accessible to people of all financial brackets. What can this new manipulation of nanomaterials do to help that? Also, geoengineering to cool down our planet sounds like an attractive idea due to global warming, but what are the benefits and pitfalls of geoengineering Earth’s climate? And how can a 3-D printer create scaffolding fit for biological cultures? That and more in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter! Join our classes to learn more about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

Flexible Nanomaterials Can Help Make Fuel Cell Cars Cheaper

(Hub)

PEM fuel cell. IMAGE CREDIT: GETTY IMAGES PEM fuel cell. IMAGE CREDIT: GETTY IMAGES

Electric cars just might be the future of transportation, but most on the market right now are pricey. Luckily, scientists are working hard to change that! In fact, it was just discovered that using nanomaterials as thin as hair just might be the key to creating much cheaper electric cars. But how does that work? Learn all about these small, flexible materials here!

Would Geoengineering Help Cool the Planet?

(Smithsonian)

A composite color image of the Western Hemisphere captured by NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite from 22,300 miles above the surface, January 15, 2017. (NOAA/NASA) A composite color image of the Western Hemisphere captured by NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite from 22,300 miles above the surface, January 15, 2017. (NOAA/NASA)

Earth has been steadily warming, and evidence shows that humans are largely to blame. In order to combat this steady rise in temperature, scientists have been exploring different methods that might help cool down our planet. One of these methods includes geoengineering, but it’s unclear whether it is a good thing. Learn all about the fascinating technologies that scientists have been looking into here!

3-D Printers Create Scaffolding Fit for Biological Cultures

(MIT News)

Illustration: Eli Gershenfeld Illustration: Eli Gershenfeld

A new printing system has been created, and it looks like biological cultures are at the center. A new 3-D printer can create mesh-like scaffolding with threads thinner than a strand of hair. As it turns out, this type of structure is perfect for growing certain cultures in a very uniform way. It’s still very new, but it has a lot of scientists excited. Check out this unique new printer here!

Love these articles? Check out TechNews4Kids to read more news like these and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

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