Vote Here to Help More Students Learn AI & Data Science!

There are few things that are more important than AI & Data Science for kids to learn today. Yet, most students don’t have a remote opportunity to teach them. Luckily, now you can help us change that by voting for our SXSW EDU 2020 session proposal. Just click on the link and vote!

Hopefully you all know by now that, at Create & Learn, we are very passionate about bringing the next generation of Computer Science education to students, grades K-9. SXSW EDU is a premier education conference. We are proposing a session that that will help more parents and educators understand the importance of learning these subjects and how they can teach it too! Watch the video below and help bring AI & Data Science to more students by voting for our SXSW EDU 2020 session proposal!


The Evolution of Listening to Music

(News For Kids)

Photo by Alan Light [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Sony changed how we listen to music in July of 1979 when they released the “Walkman.” If you don’t remember (or maybe it was before your time), this was this very first introduction to headphones attached to something you could take on a “walk” with you. Obviously, this idea really took off, and is definitely the norm now. But how did this one invention kickstart how we listen to music now? Read all about it here!

The First “Robobee” Takes Flight!

(The Harvard Gazette)

Harvard Microrobotics Lab/Harvard SEAS

Harvard researchers have been working hard to have bee-sized robots take successful untethered flights, and it looks like that’s finally happened. Their “Robobee” took flight earlier this year, and it was even caught on video! But what does this mean for the future of tiny robots? And what could they be used for? Find out all about it, and watch the fascinating video, here!

Love these articles? Check out Tech News 4 Kids to read more news like this, and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

Create & Learn Monthly — 4 Easy Ways to Tell if a Coding Program is Right for your Kids

Create & Learn Monthly — 4 Easy Ways to Tell if a Coding Program is Right for your Kids

With summer right around the corner, we are sharing some great tips for your kids’ learning and an inspiring story.

4 Simple Ways to Tell if Your Kid’s Coding Class Will Work as Advertised

(Create & Learn)

Pictures of happy kids, shiny computers, big smiles, and enticing class descriptions … this is what you see on almost every website that advertises kids computer classes. But how do you tell if your kid will really learn? Check out these 4 simple yet effective ways to tell if a program is as good as it advertises, and some of the ways might surprise you. Read on to find out more!

Meet the 10-year-old coder grabbing the attention of Google, Microsoft and Michelle Obama

(CNBC)

Samaira Mehta: CNBC

Samaira Mehta is changing the coding game, and she’s only 10! Mehta is founder and CEO of her own company CoderBunnyz, which is a board game that teaches players as young as 4 basic coding concepts. When she was learning to code, she noticed a gap in the education field that was much needed, and decided to create her own game. Learn all about Mehta and CoderBunnyz here!

Tips on how to talk to your children about cybersecurity

(IOL)

As our children grow up, it’s inevitable that technology and the internet will become part of their daily lives just as much as our own. Cybersecurity is an increasingly important issue, but when do we let our kids know of this? And what’s the best way to do it? Learn all about it here!

Do you enjoy reading articles like these? Follow us on Facebook to read more news like this and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies and research behind these topics.

4 Simple Ways to Tell if Your Kid’s Coding Class Will Work as Advertised

Pictures of happy kids, shiny computers, big smiles, and enticing class descriptions … this is what you see on almost every website that advertises kids computer classes. But how do you tell if your kid will really learn? In fact, even after your kid has gone through the program and seemed happy, how much have they actually learned?

These are important questions because coding is a critical skill to master and schools teach very little of it. So, parents have to turn to after-school programs/camps to make sure their kids fill the gap. I struggled with these questions for years myself before founding Create & Learn. My daughter started attending tech camps in summer since age 6. But results had been mostly disappointing (and the most expensive ones often fell short the most). I spent a lot of efforts figuring out what she had learned and benchmarking. But for busy parents who don’t have time, or those who don’t have a coding background, how can you tell?

Luckily over the years, we have found some very simple but strong indicators of program quality that will only take you a few minutes to check without having to do hours of deep research. The key is to go beyond the fancy pictures and words, and get to the foundation of the programs.

#1: Class Size

Your intuition probably tells you smaller class size is better already. But do you realize it pretty much sets the ceiling for how good a program can be? Even the best teacher in the world will have his/her hands tied in a large classroom because the teacher can no longer adapt to individual student’s needs. Personalized attention is particularly important for developing students’ creativity and critical thinking skills. What we have found is that if there are more than half a dozen students per class, the teaching will likely be instruction-based following a rigid template, without sufficient attention to each student’s strength and areas of needs. For elementary or middle school students who are still learning how to learn, the lack of individual attention will fail to deliver the best learning.

#2: Differentiated Projects

When you see your kid’s projects at the end of a program, don’t just get excited about what your kids have done :). Take a look at how your child’s projects are different from those of other students’. In many programs, students produce almost identical projects. This is because instead of teaching kids coding, teachers just hand detailed instructions for building the projects to students, who then blindly follow the steps. There is little true learning, exploring, and creating. As a result, even after producing the projects, many students still don’t understand what they have done.

#3: Teacher’s Background

Most camps are staffed by high school and college students. They are great people, and some may care about teaching, but can they teach well? Teaching is a skill that takes many years to master. Think for a second examples from your own school days, of both good and bad teachers. Did they make a world of difference in your own learning? Effective teachers not only help your kid do one class well, but also nourish his/her passion for learning in general. The reverse is also true. The influence of a poor teacher can go far beyond a single class. So be very mindful about who teach your kids.

#4: Who Created the Curriculum?

Learning coding is not that different from learning skills like painting or swimming in that learning from the masters or Olympians will no doubt set your kids on a much more successful path. The experiences and accomplishments in the tech world of the people who create the curriculum determine how far the program can bring your kids. If you would like your kids to go far in the tech world, find out if the curriculum team has worked in the top tech companies and if they are insiders of both the tech and business side of the broader high-tech industry, not just someone who can code.

There you have it!

To sum up, check out these 4 things before signing up your kids for a coding class/camp:

  • Class size — ideally no more than 5–6 students per class
  • Whether students produce diverse projects
  • Background of the teachers — do they have extensive teaching experiences?
  • Who created the curriculum — do they just know how to code, or have they held important technical and business roles in top tech companies?

Here’s to all of our kids having fun, learning and flourishing! If you would like to get a taste of what a first-tier program looks like, sign up for a free class at www.create-learn.us.

Can AI Really Learn How to Play Jazz? Plus, Join Our Coding Contest!

AI technology advancements have created some amazing things, including the ability to create art. What does it look like when computer scientists use AI to perform jazz music? Speaking of amazing advancements, a new technique tracks brain activity 60 times faster than an MRI, but how? And when it comes to eating with the climate in mind, what’s better: a Locavore diet or a Vegetarian one? Find out in this week’s Tech News 4 Kids newsletter!

We are also hosting a fun coding competition for those of you with children who love to use Scratch. Learn all about it and enter here! Join our classes to learn all about the latest technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

Can AI Learn How to Jam?

(Scientific American)

Credit: Eric Nyffeler

AI can do so many incredible things, like write a book, design furniture, or create art. However, some computer scientists have been wondering if AI can create improvised music, such as jazz. Find out how these questions came about, and what is next in regards to AI and music, in this article!

Real-Time Brain Activity

(The Harvard Gazette)

iStock

The human brain has fascinated scientists and biologists alike. It’s fast-reacting, and specific, neurons have been difficult to catch in real-time — until now. Researchers have found a new way to track the amazing things our brain does at such a fast pace that it’s almost like watching it happen instantly. Find out what these scientists are hoping to do with their findings, and how it all works, here!

Locavore vs. Vegetarian — What’s Better For the Planet?

(The Conversation)

Climate change is happening, and food plays a part in this. So, people have been doing their best to be more conscious of their food choices. This consciousness brought about a question — is it better to be a Locavore (where you only eat foods grown and harvested within a certain radius of your home) or a Vegetarian? Find out what researchers have found here!

Love these articles? Check out TechNews4Kids to read more news like these and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies driving these innovations.

Create & Learn Monthly — The AP Exam — Another Great Reason to Learn Computer Science Early

Create & Learn Monthly — The AP Exam — Another Great Reason to Learn Computer Science Early

Your kids’ Computer Science learning can be translated directly to college admission more so than ever as more and more students take the Computer Science AP exam. Huge progress has been made in recent years which offer strong evidence of its popularity. However, big gaps still remain for female and minority students. We took a look at the 2018 AP Exam Computer Science results and have summarized the key insights for you. Speaking of college admission, there are more competitions in computer science also, because of how desirable it is. And can kindness really be a skill we can all learn? Find out in our May 2019 Monthly Newsletter! Join our classes to learn more about the state-of-the-art technologies — coding, artificial intelligence, and more.

Despite Progress, Significant Gaps Remain for Females & Minorities in Computer Science AP Exams

(Create & Learn)

The AP (Advanced Placement) exam has been gaining traction in regards to the number of tests being taken each year. We looked at the Computer Science test numbers to see what interesting information it offers. There is a ton! Take a look at what we found in our latest article here.

What it really looks like to be a computer science hopeful

(The Daily)

Computer Science (CS) is one of the most practical and economic major to go into in college, with basically a guarantee to get a job right away. But with great job security after graduation comes great competition. Naturally, it is highly competitive to get into. So what does this mean for our children looking to merge into the field, and how can you help? Find out here.

Kindness Is a Skill

(The New York Times)

Nick Shepherd/Ikon Images, via Getty Images

What does it take to be kind? And can it be learned? Specific scenarios bring out different sides of who we are and how we handle them. Each situation is explored with a unique perspective, and how we can be the most kind we can. Find out what we can do in regards to kindness and how to build that skill set here.

Do you enjoy reading articles like these? Follow us on Facebook to read more news like this and sign up for our fun computer science classes to learn more about the technologies and research behind these topics.

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